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School of Occupational Therapy

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School of Occupational Therapy Program Outcomes

The following outcome objectives are expected upon completion of the entry-level occupational therapy curriculum. These outcomes arise directly from the missions of the University and the entry-level program, as well as from the program’s philosophical base.

Graduates of the UIndy MOT program will be able to:

Outcome I: Demonstrate entry-level knowledge and skills, including foundational knowledge in core sciences, for practice as an occupational therapist in existing and emerging practice areas.

Outcome II: Apply critical thinking and evidence-based practice principles, grounded in theories of occupation, to influence the health and well being of consumers across populations.

Outcome III: Demonstrate professional development and continuing competence through reflective practice and lifelong learning.

Outcome IV: Demonstrate holistic and client-centered practice that reflects values consistent with the occupational therapy profession.

Outcome V: Use leadership and advocacy skills in professional practice.

Graduates of the UIndy OTD program will be able to:

Outcome I: Demonstrate beyond entry-level knowledge and skills, including foundational knowledge in core sciences, for practice as an occupational therapist in existing and emerging practice areas.

Outcome II: Apply critical thinking and evidence-based practice principles, grounded in theories of occupation, to influence the health and well being of consumers across populations.

Outcome III: Demonstrate professional development and continuing competence through reflective practice and lifelong learning.

Outcome IV: Demonstrate holistic and client-centered practice that reflects values consistent with the occupational therapy profession.

Outcome V: Use leadership and advocacy skills in professional practice and at the organizational level.

Outcome VI: Demonstrate competence in the implementation of theory and program development across practice settings and populations.