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Department of Teacher Education Master of Arts in Teaching

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Master of Arts in Teaching
Course Sequence & Class Descriptions

The MAT Program is two-tiered. In the first tier, you'll complete the 28 credit hours required for a secondary teacher licensing. In the second tier, you'll complete the Master of Arts in Teaching degree. The total program is 36 credit hours and follows the sequence below.

See what classes will be offered in the next term ►
(Select your term and choose "EDUC" for the subject. )


Year 1 (Monday & Wednesday evenings)

Fall Semester

This course is an introduction to the field of psychology as it relates to the psychological principles of understanding teaching and learning, organized under the framework of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Graduate students focus their work on understanding the cognitive, emotional, social and moral development of their future adolescent students. This course includes a required field experience of 20 hours in a middle school setting.

This course includes an overview of the American educational system and the teaching profession; the philosophical and theoretical foundations underlying the role and organization of public education in the United States; an analysis of state and national standards; visits to local school sites; and, an introductory experience with project-based learning designed around school systems for ethnically and linguistically diverse students.

Online course. These courses are designed to prepare teacher education candidates to meet national and state standards in integrating technology into the classroom as an instructional tool. Instructional software, multimedia tools, the Internet, and other computer assisted learning opportunities are utilized to meet learning needs of every candidate. Candidates spend considerable time in laboratory settings gaining hands-on experience with technology. They also learn about appropriate productivity software that will enhance their personal and professional lives. The TPACK model serves as the foundation for this course.


Winter Semester

This course will offer theoretical, curricular, and practical consideration in the teaching of content area classes. Instruction includes teaching methodology, development of teaching strategies appropriate for the secondary student, association of the community and the school, the interdisciplinary nature of secondary curriculum, legal liabilities, reflection on the qualities of good teaching, and assessment.
This course includes a required field experience of 20 hours and a summative project.

The course concentrates on instruction and instructional strategies, curriculum development and organization, multicultural education and students with special needs. This Literacy-based course emphasizes formulation of units in instruction, development of specific instructional skills, reflection and assessment, and recognition of, and adaptation to, student characteristics. Curriculum development and organization emphasizes the philosophical and social bases of curriculum, the processes of designing and evaluating curriculum, and research and development. The experiences on multicultural education, students with special needs, and English language learners include recognizing, accepting, and affirming a broad view of human differences and similarities.

Online course. These courses are designed to prepare teacher education candidates to meet national and state standards in integrating technology into the classroom as an instructional tool. Instructional software, multimedia tools, the Internet, and other computer assisted learning opportunities are utilized to meet learning needs of every candidate. Candidates spend considerable time in laboratory settings gaining hands-on experience with technology. They also learn about appropriate productivity software that will enhance their personal and professional lives. The TPACK model serves as the foundation for this course.


Summer

This course concentrates on classroom organization and management, assessment and evaluation, with emphasis on meeting the needs of diverse learners. Classroom organization and management focuses on the provisions and procedures necessary to establish and maintain an environment in which instruction and learning can occur. Models of differentiation in both instruction and assessment are taught in this course. Assessment and evaluation focuses on various methods and types of evaluation including teacher-made tests, standardized tests, performance-based and portfolio assessments and project-based learning (PBL).

This course precedes the internship. The school and classroom are studied as a social system and the importance of the community in the education of young adults is emphasized. Candidates also study the relationship between data systems, cultural and climate of schools and student learning. The practices and procedures of the classroom including effective and varied teaching strategies designed to meet the needs of all learners, pupil-teacher relationships, interdisciplinary curriculum and classroom management are included. Candidates will apply the concepts they learn directly in the classroom where they are participating in their internships. Field work consists of experiences in alternative and charter schools.


Year 2

Fall Semester (daytime)

The Internship experience includes observation, participation and supervised teaching in a secondary school under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and the direction of a University supervisor. Interns engage in a variety of activities designed to aid in the development of the teaching skills, abilities, and qualities necessary for effective secondary school instruction. The required Seminars are designed to focus on portfolio preparation and specific issues encountered in the internship such as statewide testing programs, special needs, and school law and professional practice. The final assessment is the Exit from Program Portfolio.

Students develop the Exit from Program Project, a requirement for passing student teaching. Register concurrently with EDUC 594 and 596.


Winter Semester (Tuesday/Thursday evenings)

This course is an introduction to the wide range of alternative educational settings available for young people. Candidates will explore the current literature on best practices, criteria for referral, programming design and assessment, and the role of alternative schools in the general educational community. This course enables the candidate to explore alternative educational settings such as the Juvenile Center, Girl's School, Rise Learning Center, vocational centers, etc. The candidate will design a plan that includes both observation and service learning in alternative settings. Candidates will give a formal presentation of their experiences and insights. Candidates will be prepared to provide leadership in the schools where alternative options for adolescents are being considered and to transfer the best practices found in the alternative settings to regular educational settings.

A basic course in the methods of research in education; the planning and conducting of a research study; the development of skills in problem identification, data collection, analysis, interpretation, and preparation of research statistics. The importance of collection, analysis, and use of appropriate data in decision-making is emphasized.

Advanced course in content area or education. Course needs approval of MAT Program Director.