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Teach Today, Transform Tomorrow: Elementary Education

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Classes & Program Schedule

Year 1, Semester 1 – 16.5 credit hours

Core classes

ENGL 101 – English Composition or ENGL 220 – Advanced Composition (3)
FYS – First Year Seminar (3)
INTD 101 – New Student Experience (1)
KINS 101 – Wellness/Fitness for a Lifetime (1)
PSCI 207 – State, National and World Interactions (3) - This course is a survey of Social Studies content. The course explores areas such as: civics/government, economics and world history before 1700.

Education classes

This course is designed to explore multiple ways today’s schools are diverse. The goal of the class is to give those who have elected to pursue a major in education some insight into the areas they will encounter diversity (cultural, economic, linguistic, gender, religion and family structure), during their preparation and subsequent classroom experiences. Candidates will analyze diversity in learners, families, communities, learning environments, curricular approaches, and philosophies and use this knowledge to consider how to promote learning and development for all students. 2 credit hours. This course includes a field component and professional seminar.

Candidates will examine the roles humans play as members of society and the implications of those interpersonal relationships on society and the Indianapolis community. Through the implementation of a project-based learning experience, candidates will analyze the complexities of a social issue and use creative thinking and innovative approaches to solve problems. After exploring various philosophical, ethical frameworks, candidates will then draw upon political philosophy influences the beliefs and moral foundations surrounding the role of government, the nature of humanity, the role of schools and other institutions, and the purpose of education they will deconstruct common practices and be able to identify inequities that work against student interests and offer potential solutions. Candidates will build on their experiences to design a developmentally appropriate learning experience for K-6 students that promotes global awareness, understanding of global issues and connections, sense of participation in a global community, and motivation to solve global challenges. The principles of Universal Design for Learning as well as the legal and ethical requirements related to educational equality, digital citizenship and professional dispositions will be introduced as elements to consider within a global society. 3 credit hours. This course includes a field component and professional seminar.

To learn more about state, world and national interactions, candidates will visit varied classroom and community settings and resources. In collaboration with Indianapolis community partners, candidates will employ the Design Thinking Process to address and propose solutions to real-life community issues. Candidates will begin in the Inspiration space where they will discover the problem or opportunity, constraints, project framework, measurements for success and objectives to be realized. Next, candidates will move into the Ideation phase where they will consider the diverse population, gather and synthesize information from diverse stakeholders to design and test multiple ideas. Once the best idea is generated, an implementation process for prototyping, testing, iterating, and refining will be developed and presented to the community partners. Candidates will also develop ways to incorporate elementary students into their projects.

As part of the Transformational Teaching Series, this first course focuses on the key characteristic of being a COLLABORATOR. The course examines what it means to collaborate with peers, students, families and communities in the field of education. Throughout the semester, candidates will focus on developing observation skills and strategies and will reflect on how collaboration affects personal, organizational and institutional issues. Candidates will be introduced to Principles for improvement science. In addition, candidates will be introduced to the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align and include all candidates in the Elementary Education Program. .5 credit hours.

Year 1, Semester 2 – 16.5 credit hours

Core classes

ENGL 102 – Western World Lit & Comp or 218 – Young Adult Lit (3)
IREL 100 – World Geography (3)

Education classes

This course is designed to provide a foundation of the reflective teacher. Reflective teachers draw upon learning theories and concepts related to learning process from both Educational and Developmental Psychology to analyze instruction and to be responsive to the development of individual learners in varied educational contexts. In this course candidates will have an opportunity to study the typical and unique growth of learners from early childhood to early adolescence in relation to peer interactions, self-esteem, self-direction, decision making and goal setting, and the ability to help students address these challenges. 3 credit hours. This course includes a field component and professional seminar.

This course offers a broad overview of multiple literacies or varied ways people read and write (Print texts (novels, magazines, schedules) and non-print (DVDs, coding, video games), technology, information, media, digital, cultural, visual, financial and emotional) and the content and ethical requisites these literacies play in daily lives. Candidates will explore disciplinary literacy demands and academic language inherent in the math, science, engineering, technology, social studies, media, and arts and how literacy commands change across different disciplines and diverse populations. Instructional strategies to support comprehension, social understandings and learner motivation will be addressed. Candidates will explore digital resources used to create developmentally appropriate learning experiences that facilitate creativity, collaboration, inventiveness and learning in a customizable learning experience. Candidates will understand the characteristics of data literacy and its policy implications. Course applies toward a reading license. 2 credit hours. Application of multiple literacies will occur in the field setting and professional seminar.

Field experiences will be embedded into ELED 151 and 152. Candidates will develop observational and reflective thinking skills, and analyze authentic learning environments. Candidates will consider the role peer interactions, self-esteem, self-direction, decision making and goal setting play in teaching and learning particularly in relation to Multiple Literacies. Candidates will examine the role multiple literacies play in the play in the elementary classroom and investigate ways to incorporate multiple literacies into teaching. To develop a deeper understanding of data literacy,, candidates will participate in a data drive. 0 credit hours.

As part of the Transformational Teaching Series, this second course focuses on the key characteristic of being a LEARNER. The course examines what it means to be a life-long learning and challenges Elementary Education candidates to continue that process by developing inquiry and research skills. Throughout the semester, candidates will use self-assessment to understand their learning preferences and interests, identify topics in education that warrant further exploration, and conduct research on their passion project topic. In addition, candidates will interact with the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align and include all candidates in the Elementary Education Program. 0.5 credit hours.

STEM Classes

In this course, students will address real-world problems by designing solutions, modeling systems, prototyping and testing their designs and then iterating the process. In this way, they will experience the engineering design cycle and develop an appreciation for constraints and tradeoffs. They will learn how to write computer software in multiple environments and apply this skill to modeling at least one of their design solutions. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 2 credit hours.

In this course, students will experience the impact of science and technology through a series of medical case studies. As they progress students will investigate fundamental concepts of physics, chemistry, human anatomy and physiology. This course serves as an introduction to the STEM Block series. Students will deliver case study presentations, submit reflective essays and engage in group projects exploring this material. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in computational thinking, engineering and making. 3 credit hours.

Year 1, Summer – 6 credit hours (+4 STEM Seminar)

May

This course focuses on developing knowledge of the diverse students who attend our nation’s schools. This course is designed to develop an awareness of many of the different cultural/ethnic groups found in pluralistic society. This course will explore a history of the discrimination that many minority groups have encountered in North America and possible educational strategies for dealing with the challenges or barriers minority groups have encountered in the educational process. The course includes a field component. 3 credit hours.
In this field experience, candidates will conduct Diversity: Windshield Surveys in which they will use community participatory action research to become more familiar with the ways in which diversity is situated within various community and family settings; how systemic discrimination impacts social, economic, and educational opportunities; and how society uses “labeling” to construct definitions of deviance and social norms. Candidates will use the tools of social science research to become more comfortable with the unfamiliar and the concept of the “other.” 0 credit hours.

August

Taught in an Early Childhood Center, this course focuses on curriculum and assessment issues in early childhood education. Topics include child and school readiness, Family Literacy, language development, Concepts About Print, phonemic awareness, Environmental Print, mathematical reasoning, computational thinking, developmentally appropriate practice, formal and informal assessments, and the role of play in learning. Course applies toward a reading license. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program. The course includes a field component. 3 credit hours.
Candidates will be fully immersed in an Early Childhood Center allowing the opportunity for them to observe, assess, reflect and plan for emergent literacy in collaboration with classroom teachers. 0 credit hours.

For Transfers only – August

This ELED course will serve as an introduction to a set of three courses examining the Interdisciplinary nature of Elementary Education. This course is intended for candidates transferring into Elementary Education who have had some philosophy content without the connected field experience in an elementary school. Candidates will analyze diversity in learners, families, communities, learning environments, curricular approaches, and philosophies and use this knowledge to consider how to promote learning and development for all students. Through the implementation of a project-based learning experience, candidates will analyze the complexities of a social issue and use creative thinking and innovative approaches to solve problems. The principles of Universal Design for Learning as well as the legal and ethical requirements related to educational equality, digital citizenship and professional dispositions will be introduced as elements to consider within a global society. Modules will be used to address competencies needs identified through pre-assessments for ELED 101, ELED 102. There will be a culminating STEM project in which candidates demonstrate proficiency for ELED and SCI competencies. The course includes a field component. 2 credit hours.
This STEM course will serve as an introduction to a set if three courses that examine the Interdisciplinary nature of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics at the Elementary Level. This course is intended for candidates transferring into Elementary Education who have had science content course(s) without the connected field experience in an elementary school. Candidates will investigate fundamental science concepts through a series of case studies. In this course, candidates will experience the engineering design cycle and develop an appreciation for constraints and tradeoffs. They will learn how to write computer software in multiple environments and apply this skill to modeling at least one of their design solutions. Modules will be used to address competencies needs identified through pre-assessments for ENGR 101 and SCI 101. There will be a culminating STEM project in which candidates demonstrate proficiency for ELED and SCI competencies. The course includes a field component. Prerequisite: A science course. 2 credit hours.
Candidates will learn more about state, world and national interactions through visiting varied classroom and community settings and resources. The Design Thinking Process will be employed to address and propose solutions to real-life community issues. There will be a culminating STEM project in which candidates demonstrate proficiency for ELED and SCI competencies. 0 credit hours.

Year 2, Semester 1 – 15.5 credit hours

Core classes

COMM 201 - Classroom Communication
INTD/LP Credit

Education classes

Candidates will work as a team to complete problem/project-based modules. PBL is defined as an instructional method that compels learners to apply critical thinking, problem-finding and solving skills, and content knowledge to real-world, community-based problems and issues. In project and problem-based learning, candidates assume a major responsibility to construct their own learning by becoming action researchers and problem solvers. In this course, candidates will identify and address challenges in their community that center on the intersection of student, school, and family collaboration, self-agency and efficacy, and the ecology of early learning environments both formal and informal. Candidates will look for avenues to coordinate and collaborate with community institutions, programs and organizations that advocate for and serve children and families. Course applies toward licenses in mild interventions and reading. 2 credit hours.
This course focuses on the emergent learner (kindergarten-first grade) and curriculum and assessment issues in early childhood literacy, mathematics, and science education. Emphasis is placed on creating classrooms that encourage exploration and communication of ideas using developmentally appropriate practice. Literacy focuses on explicit, hands-on instruction in print concepts, oral language, phonological awareness, letter knowledge, phonics, linguistics, as well as fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The use and analysis of assessments will inform instructional plans. Candidates will learn how to use existing curriculum to create and manage an environment that immerses young learners in daily opportunities to participate in readers’ and writers’ workshops and integrated disciplinary STEM units. Literacy instruction will include reading aloud, shared reading and writing, guided reading and writing, word study, self- selected reading and bookmaking. Science and mathematics instruction will focus on inquiry-based approaches to develop conceptual understandings. Various learning technologies will be employed to create flexible and barrier-free instructional materials and assessments. Course applies toward a reading license. The course includes a field component and professional seminar. 3 credit hours.
This ELED course will serve as the second in a series of three courses examining the Interdisciplinary nature of Elementary Education. This course is intended for candidates transferring into Elementary Education who have had some psychology content without the connected field experience in an elementary school. This course will specifically look at learning theories and concepts related to learning process from both Educational and Developmental Psychology to analyze instruction and to be responsive to the development of individual learners in varied educational contexts. In this course candidates will have an opportunity to study the typical and unique growth of learners from early childhood to early adolescence in relation to peer interactions, self-esteem, self-direction, decision making and goal setting, and the ability to help students address these challenges. Modules will be used to address competencies needs identified through pre-assessments for ELED 151. There will be a culminating STEM project in which candidates demonstrate proficiency for ELED and SCI competencies. The field requirements of this course will be incorporated into EDUC 202 or 203 or arranged by candidate. 1 credit hour
This course is designed to present models and introduction to the characteristics, history, and identification of students with exceptionalities, including mild dis/abilities, high ability and twice exceptional. Particular attention is devoted to understanding exceptionalities as a social construct, the impact of labels on children and families, and the concepts of cultural competence and normalization. Strategies of working collaboratively with other professionals and families to optimize the outcomes of the child in the inclusive classroom and community are stressed. Course applies toward license in mild interventions. The course includes a field component. 2 credit hours.
Candidates will work in primary classrooms to observe, assess, reflect and plan literacy, STEM and interdisciplinary lessons. Candidates in collaboration with a classroom teacher to serve as action researchers and problem solvers. They will also coordinate and collaborate with community institutions, programs and organizations that advocate for and serve children and families. 0 credit hours.
As part of the Transformational Teaching Series, this third course focuses on the key characteristic of being an ADVOCATE. The course examines the role of social change in education and challenges Elementary Education candidates to recognize and initiate opportunities to eliminate disparities in social/education experiences for all. Throughout the semester, candidates will analyze the impact of politics on the classroom and the field of education and continue developing the passion projects launched in the previous course. In addition, candidates will interact with the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align and include all candidates in the Elementary Education Program. 0.5 credit hours.

STEM classes

Fundamental concepts of basic arithmetic for elementary teachers. Topics include problem solving, sets, whole numbers, numeration systems, number theory, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and functions. Math 208 is the first of a three-course sequence designed to explore topics from elementary school mathematics as addressed by both the Indiana State Standards and the principles and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Students will put these topics into practice as they explore appropriate and associated teaching methods in their school of education courses and field experiences. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 3 credit hours.
This course introduces students to the methods by which we develop understanding of the history of the universe. Specific emphasis will be on the formation of our solar system and particular properties of our planet with an emphasis on the development of life and the mechanisms responsible for plate tectonics. Students will be guided in their investigations through a short series of inquiry projects and will develop a set of educational activities appropriate to elementary students. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 2 credit hours.
This STEM course will serve as the second in a set of three courses that examine the Interdisciplinary nature of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics at the Elementary Level. This course is intended for candidates transferring into Elementary Education who have had science content course(s) without the connected field experience in an elementary school. Candidates will investigate fundamental science concepts through a series of case studies. In this course, candidates will experience the engineering design cycle and develop an appreciation for constraints and tradeoffs. They will learn how to write computer software in multiple environments and apply this skill to modeling at least one of their design solutions. Modules will be used to address competencies needs identified through pre-assessments for ENGR 101 and SCI 101. There will be a culminating STEM project in which candidates demonstrate proficiency for ELED and SCI competencies. The field requirements of this course will be incorporated into EDUC 202 or 203 or arranged by candidate. Prerequisite: A science course. 1 credit hour.

Year 2, Semester 2 – 15.5 credit hours

Core classes

HIST 202 - World History Since 1700
Art 110 - Art Appreciation, MUS 110 - Introduction to Music, or THE 110 - Introduction to Theatre (INTD Arts)

Education classes

This ELED course will serve as the third in a series of three courses examining the Interdisciplinary nature of Elementary Education. This course is intended for candidates transferring into Elementary Education. This course offers a broad overview of multiple literacies and the content and ethical requisites these literacies play in daily lives. Candidates will explore disciplinary literacy demands and academic language inherent in the math, science, engineering, technology, social studies, media, and arts and how literacy commands change across different disciplines and diverse populations. Additional focus will be on the opportunities for customizable learning experiences through digital and data literacy as well as the policy and ethical implications. Modules will be used to address competencies needs identified through pre-assessments for ELED 152. There will be a culminating STEM project in which candidates demonstrate proficiency for ELED and SCI competencies. The field requirements of this course will be incorporated into EDUC 251 or 252 or arranged by candidate. 1 credit hour.
In this course, candidates will use the principles of UDL to design curriculum that incorporates the flexibility necessary to maximize learning opportunities for all students to build STEM knowledge and skills. Candidates will study the neuroscience of learning STEM to design instructionally rich STEM environments and experiences that engage learners, activate their thinking, and develop deep understanding. Various learning technologies will be employed to create flexible and barrier-free instructional materials and assessments. Course applies toward license in mild interventions. 2 credit hours.
Building on the knowledge-base for emergent learners, candidates will learn how to plan and implement lessons for Developing Learners who participate in readers’ and writers’ workshops and integrated disciplinary STEM units. Focus will be on developing comprehension and fluency strategies to support and scaffold learners as they progress through increasingly more complex texts. Candidates will learn how to employ questioning strategies that develop students’ higher level thinking skills. STEM lessons will be developed focusing on three disciplinary literacy aspects: texts, claims and evidence, and disciplinary practices. Various learning technologies will be employed to create flexible and barrier-free instructional materials and assessments. Course applies toward a reading license. 3 credit hours.
Candidates will employ the principles of UDL to develop and implement lesson plans, materials, and assessments for students who are challenged in different domains of STEM, with an added emphasis on mathematics. In conjunction with the classroom teacher and the course instructor, candidates will assess student needs, conduct an ecological mathematics survey, assess current classroom environment, tutor 1-5 students, and evaluate student-learning outcomes through data collection and analysis. Literacy will also be addressed through plan and implement lessons in in readers’ and writers’ workshops and integrated disciplinary STEM units. This field will also incorporate maker pedagogy in which students apply mathematical thinking to construct real objects, games, and simulations through the use of 3-D printers, computer software, and workshop tools. 0 credit hours.
As part of the Transformational Teaching Series, this fourth course focuses on the key characteristic of being a PROBLEM SOLVER. The course examines what it means to use data to guide instruction and to solve problems in the classroom or field of education. Throughout the semester, candidates will consider facts and reflect using data, intuition, and logic to look for instructional opportunities to ensure students are challenged to reach maximum potential. Candidates will continue to develop their passion projects by looking deeply at methodologies and research design. In addition, candidates will interact with the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align and include all candidates in the Elementary Education Program. 0.5 credit hours.

STEM classes

A constructivist approach to fundamental concepts of number theory, set theory, statistics, and probability for elementary teachers. Topics include number theory, sets and Venn diagrams, data collection, visual representations of data, data analysis including measures of central tendency, normal distributions, experimental probability, and basic theoretical probability. May not count toward a mathematics major or minor. Math 209 is the second of a three-course sequence designed to explore topics from elementary school mathematics as addressed by the Common Core Standards, Indiana Academic Standards, and the principles and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Topics are addressed in chapters two, four and seven of the textbook. Students will put these topics into practice as they explore appropriate and associated teaching methods in school of education courses and field experiences. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 3 credit hours.
This STEM course will serve as the third in a set of three courses that examine the Interdisciplinary nature of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics at the Elementary Level. This course is intended for candidates transferring into Elementary Education who have had science content course(s) without the connected field experience in an elementary school. Candidates will investigate This STEM course will serve as the third in a set of three courses that examine the Interdisciplinary nature of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics at the Elementary Level. This course is intended for candidates transferring into Elementary Education who have had science content course(s) without the connected field experience in an elementary school. Candidates will investigatefundamental science concepts through a series of case studies. In this course, candidates will experience the engineering design cycle and develop an appreciation for constraints and tradeoffs. They will learn how to write computer software in multiple environments and apply this skill to modeling at least one of their design solutions. Modules will be used to address competencies needs identified through pre-assessments for ENGR 101 and SCI 101. There will be a culminating STEM project in which candidates demonstrate proficiency for ELED and SCI competencies. The field requirements of this course will be incorporated into EDUC 251 or 252 or arranged by candidate. Prerequisite: A science course. 1 credit hour.
In this course, students will explore the basis of life and the processes that support life. Investigations will center on the fundamental chemical, biochemical and biological factors, especially focusing on water and the interconversion of energy from food and respiration. Students will engage in inquiry activities (how do we know something is or was alive and how do we feed a refuge colony?) that address essential questions. Other activities include laboratory investigation, case study presentations and reflective essays. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 2 credit hours.

Year 2, Summer – 6 credit hours

May

Through this international experience candidates will immerse themselves in an diverse educational setting for four weeks. Opportunities to explore the cultural and natural wonders of the destination will exist as well. During this time, candidates will examine and explore the diversity in learners, philosophies, societies, systems and schools within a global setting. Candidates will learn educational strategies for addressing varied learners needs. Through a choice of two differing placements, candidates will conduct a cultural immersion project that examines the curriculum, culture, as well as the Transformational Teacher Qualities (communicator, collaborator, learner, leader, innovator, problem solver, researcher and advocate) evident in their international placement. This placement will further develop candidate’s global competencies, understandings of working with diverse learners, and the impacts of living within a global society. 3 credit hours.

August

In this course, candidates will use the principles of UDL to design and differentiate curriculum and assessments in order to build the literacy skills for all learners, including students with mild dis/abilities, high abilities, twice exceptional, and English language learners. Candidates will study the neuroscience of learning and utilize this knowledge to conduct comprehensive assessments and evaluations of students’ reading processes. Data collected will be used to devise rich literacy experiences that engage all learners at every developmental stage, activate their thinking, and develop deep understanding. Instances where corrective instruction in reading and writing – phonological awareness, developmental spelling, word recognition, fluency, phonic and linguistic knowledge and comprehension – will be explored. Various learning technologies will be employed to create flexible and barrier-free instructional materials and assessments. Course applies toward license in mild interventions. 3 credit hours.
Candidates will employ the principles of UDL to develop and implement lesson plans, materials, and assessments for students who are challenged in different literacy domains. In conjunction with the classroom teacher and the course instructor, candidates will assess student needs, conduct an ecological literacy survey, assess the current classroom environment, tutor 1-5 students, and evaluate student-learning outcomes through data collection and analysis. 0 credit hours.

Year 3, Semester 1 – 16.5 credit hours

Core classes

HIST 207 - Brief History of the United States + IN History
INTD ARTS XXX - Art, Music, and Theatre Methods for Elementary Teachers

Education classes

In literacy, opportunities for embedding STEM naturally exist. Candidates will use their STEM disciplinary literacy knowledge to develop a curricular unit and instructional lesson plans by examining curricular maps, analyzing scope and sequences, and unpacking literacy and STEM content standards. UDL and rich expository text will be employed to design inquiry-based learning opportunities that allow students to participate in Socratic seminars and discipline-specific collaborative research opportunities. Instructional and assessment strategies will be demonstrated and applied in field experiences (ELED 302) developing fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension with fictional and informational texts. This field will also incorporate maker pedagogy in which students use literacy to guide their construction of real objects, games, and simulations through the use of 3-D printers, computer software, and workshop tools. Course applies toward a reading license. Course taught on-site at local school. 3 credit hours.
This course will provide candidates with the knowledge and skills to integrate, evaluate, and apply a range of adaptive and assistive technologies (AT) to support students with dis/abilities and learning differences to participate fully and equally in educational activities, environments, and expectations. Moreover, candidates will incorporate their knowledge of UDL and engineering design thinking to innovate or create new AT to address the specific needs of an individual or for general use. Candidates will present their prototypes to relevant end-users and expert reviewers. Course applies toward license in mild interventions. 2 credit hours.
Candidates will apply their STEM disciplinary literacy knowledge in an intermediate classroom. Field will focus on the use of instructional and assessment strategies as well as embedding discipline-specific collaborative research opportunities. The use of assistive technology will also be incorporated. 0 credit hours.
As part of the Transformational Teaching Series, this fifth course focuses on the key characteristic of being a COMMUNICATOR. The 1 credit hour course examines what it means to communicate effectively with peers, students, families and communities in the field of education. Throughout the semester, candidates will focus on developing skills and strategies in regards to active listening and clear communication. Candidates will continue to develop their passion projects. In addition, candidates will interact with the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align and include all candidates in the Elementary Education Program. 0.5 credit hours.

STEM classes

A constructivist approach to fundamental concepts of measurement and geometry for elementary teachers. Topics include proportional reasoning, units of measure in the metric and U.S. customary systems, unit conversions, congruence, perimeter, area, volume, figures in one, two, and three dimensions; transformational geometry, symmetry, similarity, and tilings. Math 210 is a continuation of MATH 208 and 209, exploring topics from elementary school mathematics as addressed by both the Indiana Academic Standards and the principles and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Topics are addressed primarily in chapters eight through ten of the textbook. Students will put these topics into practice as they explore appropriate and associated teaching methods in school of education courses and field experiences. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 3 credit hours.
In this course, students will investigate concepts central to our understanding of plant and animal biology, information and energy physics. Students will engage with case studies, in order to explore the science of medical imaging, along with fundamental concepts related to disease, genetics, and energy in the human body. Students will engage in laboratory investigations, case study presentations and reflective essays. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 2 credit hours.

Year 3, Semester 2 – 15.5 credit hours

Core classes

KINS 351 - Physical Education
KINS 352 - Health Methods for Elementary Classroom
REL XXX - Religion elective of choice

Education classes

In this course, candidates will study the history, issues, and challenges of meeting the needs of all learners through multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS) and special education. Candidates will understand the various methods needed to support students with learning, behavior, or social problems through the systematic delivery of a range of interventions based on demonstrated levels of need. Creating schoolwide systems of student success consist of a range of methodologies such as positive behavior interventions and support (PBIS), differentiated instruction, response to instruction (RtI), assessments, and early warning systems to identify students at risk and provide timely intervention. Course applies toward licenses in mild interventions and reading. 3 credit hours.
In this course, candidates will explore the history, issues, and challenges of inclusion as a societal ideology and one in which students with dis/abilities are educated alongside typical students in the general education classroom. Methods such as co-teaching will be studied as a way to create full-inclusion schools and classrooms.’ Legal and ethical requirements related to educational equity, health and safety, confidentiality, reporting, record keeping and accountability will be explored. Candidates will visit schools that promote different inclusion models and speak to experts in the field of special and general education. In addition, candidates will be exposed to unique challenges of inclusion such as how to build inclusive maker spaces, science labs, tools, and technologies that have ‘low floors, high ceilings, and wide walls. Course applies toward license in mild interventions. 2 credit hours.
In this field experience, candidates will engage in three modules. In module one, teams of candidates will study the full continuum of multi-tiered systems of support within schools and community agencies that serve individuals with dis/abilities. While using the tools of social science research and the Hippocratic oath’s moral imperative “to do no harm,” candidates will assess the social, economic, and psychological impact of these environments on the targeted clientele. During module two, candidates will engage in a classroom co-teaching experience and evaluate the effectiveness of this model as an educational inclusion strategy. During module three, candidates will assess the Response to Instruction & Intervention process (RtI) by assisting and tutoring students who are currently receiving academic or behavior services in tiers 2 and 3. This field experience will culminate in a dialogic-design challenge in which teams of candidates will engage invited community participants in an evocative and substantive interrogation of the following statement: Inclusive Education cannot be provided for all students. 0 credit hours.
Transformational Teaching Series, this sixth course focuses on the key characteristic of being a LEADER. This course examines what it means to be a leader in the field of education and challenges Elementary Education candidates to set personal goals for leadership and professional growth. Throughout the semester, candidates will use self-assessment to understand their leadership styles and identify ways in which to seek funds and opportunities for their passion projects, school initiatives, and the advancement of the profession. Candidates will develop a basic understanding of statistics and computer applications for research to strengthen their passion projects. In addition, candidates will interact with the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align and include all candidates in the Elementary Education Program. 0.5 credit hours.

STEM classes

Culminating work from the Transformational Teacher course, candidates will have the opportunity to explore a topic of interest, develop a project proposal, and bring their passion and ideas to life in a local school or community setting. Throughout the course, candidates will identify, develop or use new methods, strategies, and technologies to engage students and the community. Using Design Thinking to build a project, with step-by-step guidance on research, design, and implementation, candidates will finalize their project proposals and deliver their research and project proposal in a professional presentation to an audience of key stakeholders, including faculty, k-12 teachers, school leaders and community partners. There will serve as a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the all STEM and EL ED blocks. 2 credit hours.
This course expands on and applies conceptual mastery of principles of physics, chemistry, and biology to explore the complex relationships between living organisms and planet Earth. Students will investigate the water and carbon cycles, evolution and species diversity, geography and biodiversity, the influence of living organisms on planet Earth, and the influence of planet Earth on mankind and other living organisms. There will be a culminating STEM project in which students bridge the concepts from this course and the concurrent course in the STEM block. 3 credit hours.

Year 3, Summer – 6 (+1) credit hours

May

Working in a K-6 classroom, candidates will implement their Passion Project. Candidates guide their students through an inquiry-based learning experience where the students will problem-solve, and synthesize and reflect upon learning. Simultaneously, candidates will self-reflect. Using peer observation protocols, candidates will engage in gathering and analyzing classroom data. Candidates will present the peer observer with a focus question about which he or she wants to learn more. Particular attention will be given to student learning and instructional methods. Peer observers will collect focus data and meet with the candidate to review and reflect upon the data. Candidates will use the data to inform future lessons. 3 credit hours.
As part of the Transformational Teaching Series, this course focuses on the key characteristic of being an RESEARCHER. The course examines what it means to implement your research design, collect, analyze, and interpret data, present research findings and propose future research implications in the field of education. In addition, candidates will interact with the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align the Elementary Education Program. 0 credit hours.

August

This course presents a framework for creating an instructional environment based on a system of student school-wide success. Candidates will understand and practice proactive and preventative classroom management activities to establish a culture for learning that promotes the academic, behavioral, and social success of students. These approaches range from the techniques of self-management to collaborative problem solving. Candidates will explore factors and situations that tend to promote or diminish student engagement in learning and develop the abilities to apply skills and strategies for promoting students’ active engagement and self-motivation. To understand causes of challenging behaviors, candidates will develop and implement functional assessments and behavior support plans in clinical settings. An overview of conflict resolution and bully prevention curricula will be provided as well as strategies to manage and prevent school-based crises. Student teaching or 20 hours of field experience required. Course applies toward license in mild interventions. 2 credit hours.
Advanced study in the area of reading. Major trends and current issues in reading education are explored. Supervised experience, which includes diagnostic/prescriptive approaches for remedial reading, is provided. Course applies toward a reading license. Prerequisites: Completion of all education and major requirements. 1 credit hour.
Supervised interaction with students with mild dis/abilities experiencing significant difficulties in academic, social, and/or behavioral functioning. Placements are arranged at appropriate schools. Prerequisite: Complete all education and major requirements. 1 credit hour.

Year 4, Semester 1 – 12.5 credit hours

Education classes

Observation, participation, and student teaching at the primary grade level under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and the direction of the University supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of all education and major requirements. 6-12 credit hours.
Observation, participation, and student teaching at the intermediate grade level under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and the direction of the University supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of all education and major requirements. 6-12 credit hours.
Supervised interaction with students with mild dis/abilities experiencing significant difficulties in academic, social, and/or behavioral functioning. Placements are arranged at appropriate schools. Prerequisite: Complete all education and major requirements. 6 credit hours.
As part of the Transformational Teaching Series, this course focuses on the key characteristic of being an INNOVATOR. The course examines what it means to introduce new ideas in the field of education. Throughout the semester, candidates will identify, develop or use new methods, strategies, and technologies to engage students and the community. Candidates will launch passion project in their student teaching placement. In addition, candidates will interact with the other 6 key characteristics of transformational teaching and participate in a series of Town Hall meetings that vertically align and include all the candidates in the Elementary Education Program. 0.5 credit hours.