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Event information & tickets: 317-788-3251
At a Glance

Fifth Third Bank Campus Sculpture Walk

A variety of artwork decorates the UIndy campus through the campus sculpture walk. Sponsored by Fifth Third Bank, the free outdoor art exhibition features work by artists from around the country. Sculptures vary greatly in size, style and subject, and most were chosen for inclusion through the Fifth Third Bank Campus Sculpture Walk Competition. Twenty-four sculptures are included in the exhibition.

1. Sol y Sombra - Bernie Carreño
2. Dot to Dot - Shawn Phillip Morin
3. Wave Form Two - Gary Gresko
4. Temple XVIII - Austin Collins 
5. Flowers and Wallpaper - Catherine Schlebecker
6. Totem - Dee Schaad
7. Adam and Eve - Lee Benson 
8. Numinous Wedge - Jay Dougan 
9. Universal Continuum - Beverly Precious 
10. Anatomy Vessel - Eric Nordgulen
11. Rain - Kevin Lyles
12. The Train I Ride: Observation - Jake Webster 
 
13. Firefly - Lee Badger
14. Modular Tower - Barry Barnes
15. Freedom's Folly - Kenneth Ryden
16. Big Red Prop Flower - Jennifer Meyer
17. Stand of Poppies - Jennifer Meyer
18. Quit Whining - Macy Dorf
19. Precautions - Bernie Carreño
20. On a Worldly Roll - Garry Bibbs
21. Totem to Aging - Bernie Carreño 
22. Connected - Bernie Carreño
23. Caterpillar - Brian Ferriby
24. Source - K. Brunett & K. Thielking 


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Near the west entrance of campus, next to the Fifth Third Bank, stands the bright yellow steel sculpture Sol y Sombra by Bernie Carreño. The sculpture was inspired by brilliant sunlight at a bullfight in Madrid, Spain. Carreño received his BFA and MFA in sculpture from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is currently the head of the Sculpture Department at the Indianapolis Art Center. In addition to his role at the IAC, he is a working sculptor with numerous commissions and awards to his credit.

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Close to the west entrance of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center is artist Shawn Phillip Morin’s sculpture, Dot to Dot, made of granite, steel, and stainless steel. Morin, who received his MFA in sculpture from the University of Georgia at Athens, now heads the sculpture program at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Morin’s work has been widely exhibited and collected throughout the U.S.

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Northwest of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center are two sculptures. Wave Form Two, by Gary Gresko of Oriental, North Carolina, consists of salvaged wood from docks destroyed by hurricanes. “Art for me is an exploration in both style and materials,” he says. “The journey, the surprises, the excitement comes with the unexpected.”

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Universal Continuum part of the Fifth Third Sculpture Walk on the campus of University of Indianapolis

Closer to the entrance to the Department of Art and Design office is the large red steel sculpture Temple XVIII by Austin Collins. Collins received an MFA from Claremont (Cal.) Graduate Uni­versity and a Master of Divinity degree from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. He is a professor in the Depart­ment of Art, Art History, and Design at the University of Notre Dame. His work is included in many collections, including those of Loyola, University of Chicago, and California State University-Hayward.

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Catherine Schlebecker’s terra-cotta sculpture, Flowers & Wallpaperis across the drive near the Sease Wing of the Krannert Memorial Library building. Schlebecker is an art educator and graduate student at the University.

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Dee Schaad, a professor in the Department of Art and Design at the University of Indianapolis, has installed a clay sculpture, Totem, outside the ceramics class­room. His work is included in a number of public and private collections, includ­ing the University of Evansville and the Sheldon Swope Art Museum located in Terre Haute, Indiana.

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Lee Benson is the chair of the Depart­ment of Art and Design at Union Uni­versity in Tennessee. His ceramic work, Adam & Eve, stands between the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center and Esch Hall.

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Three sculptures stand in front of the Krannert Memorial Library. Numinous Wedge is a wood and steel work by Jay Dougan, a professor and artist living in Colorado.

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Universal Continuum is a metal and glass sculpture by Beverly Precious, an artist internationally known for her site-specific large-scale pieces that incorporate dichroic glass to produce a dramatic kinetic effect.

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Anatomy Vessel is by Eric Nordgulen, chair of the Fine Arts Department and associate professor of sculpture at the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI. Eric’s work can be seen on Massachusetts Avenue in Indianapolis and in numerous public and private collections.

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Southwest of Martin Hall is Rain by Kevin Lyles. Rain uses steel and stone to capture Lyles’s impression of a rainstorm. His work is inspired by the inherent patterns, contrasts, textures, and contradictions in nature. He combines natural properties with the elements and principles of art and design to create work that interests and challenges him. Lyles has been a professor of art at the University of Rio Grande in southwest Ohio since 1990. He has a BFA from Abilene Christian University and an MFA in sculpture from Bradley University. Lyles’s work is included in private and public collections both regionally and nationally.

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On the northwest corner of Smith Mall, near Martin Hall, sits Jake Webster’s The Train I Ride: Observation, a painted red oak sculpture. Webster is a sculptor, mixed media artist, and spo­ken-word performer. His work addresses his community and his environment. He uses the tradition of direct carving and applies a contemporary attitude by creat­ing art with whatever is at hand to tell his story. “I use simple tools to cut simple shapes,” he says, “to make a simple state­ment about a simple world we have made more complex.” His work is included in many private and public collections. He lives and works in Elkhart, Indiana.

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Universal Continuum part of the Fifth Third Sculpture Walk on the campus of University of Indianapolis

At the southeast corner of Lilly Science Hall is Lee Badger's forged and hot-worked structural steel sculpture, Firefly. Badger, from Hedgesville, West Virginia, "has a close working relationship with fire, a challenging artistic subject. Using high-tech fires from an electronic torch, and a gas jet furnace to cut and bend and I-beam into a form suggesting an opening zipper, adding forged steel flames finished with an oxide patina because rust is the way steel burns in air."

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South of the Schwitzer Student Center are two additional artworks. The stone­ware sculpture Modular Tower, by Barry Barnes, is the result of a spontane­ous approach to the ceramic surface. Each modular block is approached as an indi­vidual “canvas” investigation—a collage of textures, line, shape, pattern, color, and recognizable images. Engobes and underglazes are layered on stoneware clay and fired to cone 7 in oxidation. Barnes has a BFA in ceramics from the Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA from Arizona State University. He owns a private studio, Beech Grove Clayworks, for working and teaching. He also teaches ceramics at Vincennes University.

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Freedom’s Folly is an aluminum fabrication by artist Kenneth Ryden, depicting the contrasting definitions of the term “freedom.” Self-determination and individual expression are implied. A native of Chicago, Ryden taught and served as artist-in-residence at several Midwestern universities, including South­ern Illinois University and the University of Missouri. He is artist-in-residence and professor of art at Anderson University and lives in Yorktown, Indiana.

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Located in Esch Hall, opposite Quit Whiningstands Big Red Prop Flower, a composite of found objects altered and painted. This sculpture by Jennifer Meyer, Lansing, Illinois, was inspired by ecological and environmental concerns. The collection and assemblage of these found objects that were once discarded is her attempt “to clean up the planet.”

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On the north side of Esch Hall, facing Smith Mall, is another work by Jennifer Meyer, Stand of Poppies, a composite of found objects assembled, painted and altered.

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At the southeast corner of Lilly Science Hall is Lee Badger's forged and hot-worked structural steel sculpture, Firefly. Badger, from Hedgesville, West Virginia, "has a close working relationship with fire, a challenging artistic subject. Using high-tech fires from an electronic torch, and a gas jet furnace to cut and bend and I-beam into a form suggesting an opening zipper, adding forged steel flames finished with an oxide patina because rust is the way steel burns in air."

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Precautions is a welded steel and cast iron sculpture by Bernie Carreño (see Sol y Sombra). Precautions repre­sents the need of individuals to consider whether they or the world they live in are ready for one more child. The intent is to provoke thought and make parenting a deliberate decision, rather than an accident of passion.

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On a Worldly Roll by Garry Bibbs, made of stainless steel and bronze, welcomes visitors to campus from the west on Hanna Avenue. Garry Bibbs is on the faculty of the University of Kentucky. His work can be seen in numerous public and private collections.

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Universal Continuum part of the Fifth Third Sculpture Walk on the campus of University of Indianapolis

Totem to Aging 

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Northeast of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center and near the Krannert Memorial Library sits 
Connected, a bronze and steel sculpture by Bernie Carreño (see Soly y Sombra). The steel portions represent individuals, countries, or groups and their tendency to be isolated. The cast bronze section is the connection that keeps these entities from floating completely apart. This is the state that keeps us from ever being disconnected from our past involvements and relationships. The bronze represents flexibility and can move closer and farther apart depending on time and situation.

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Northeast of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center and near the Krannert Memorial Library sits 
Connected, a bronze and steel sculpture by Bernie Carreño (see Soly y Sombra). The steel portions represent individuals, countries, or groups and their tendency to be isolated. The cast bronze section is the connection that keeps these entities from floating completely apart. This is the state that keeps us from ever being disconnected from our past involvements and relationships. The bronze represents flexibility and can move closer and farther apart depending on time and situation.

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Near Good Hall on the corner of Hanna and Otterbein Avenues is K. Brunett and K. Thielking's Source. This piece depicts an abstracted river, whose wave forms flow and change through their intersection with the wind. Brunett and Thielking each have an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and work collaboratively in a variety of media.

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