Skip to content

School of Psychological Sciences Clinical Psychology Doctorate (PsyD)

Browse Department

PsyD Courses

This listing includes descriptions of all core courses in the PsyD curriculum, the courses offered for each concentration, and the courses needed for optional completion of a master's degree. While all concentration courses are listed, only nine credit hours are required to complete a concentration. View the course sequence to see the order in which you will take your core courses.

Core courses

This course provides a broad understanding of the profession of psychology, the competencies that are essential for professionals in the field, the various requirements of the School of Psychological Sciences, and the developmental processes through which students move towards becoming professional psychologists. Students will be required to engage in critical self-examination and reflection about their own values, assumptions, and beliefs as part of this course. (0 credit hours)

This course addresses more advanced issues in professional development within psychology. It focuses on the transition from doctoral student to professional psychologist. This course is designed to support students as they matriculate to pre-doctoral internships, and provide some information on post-doctoral fellowships and early post-graduate careers. Specific structure and guidance is provided to help students successfully obtain clinical positions in an increasingly competitive environment. (0 credit hours)

This course involves a detailed presentation of the various methods used by psychologists in experimental research and design, as well as the statistical techniques which are used to analyze data. Both parametric and non-parametric techniques are reviewed along with various experimental and quasi-experimental designs. Topics include hypothesis testing and the experimental method, choosing appropriate statistical techniques, threats to internal and external validity, and varieties of experimental control and randomization. Students will be expected to perform statistical procedures on sample data sets and draw conclusions from the results of statistical analyses. (3 credit hours)

This course extends the foundational topics covered in PSY 505, focusing more deeply on statistical methods including topics such as parametric/nonparametric statistics, univariate statistics, and multivariate statistics. Students will develop competencies in choosing appropriate statistical procedures, testing assumptions, data analyses, interpreting results, and presenting findings in a manner consistent with publication standards. Prerequisite: PSY-505 (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts in psychological assessment, including the assessment of personality. The course will prepare the student with beginning skills in the mental status examination; and the administration, scoring, interpretation, and write-up of several basic psychological assessment instruments. Students must enroll concurrently in the Fundamentals of Psychological Assessment Laboratory. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-556 Fundamentals of Psychological Assessment Lab. (2 credit hours)

Covers the development, administration, scoring, and interpretation of the most commonly used intelligence and achievement tests. Includes coverage of the various Wechsler Scales, Stanford-Binet, DAS, WIAT, Woodcock-Johnson Battery, various measures of adaptive behavior, and other related tests of interest. Test selection, report writing, and diversity issues in appropriate test usage are also discussed. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-557 Cognitive Assessment Lab. (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to cover important types of personality tests not yet covered in the assessment curriculum. The course is designed to develop the student’s skills in selection of assessment methods, integration of all assessment data, case formulation, diagnosis, and treatment planning based on assessment findings. Students must concurrently enroll in the Comprehensive Personality Assessment Lab while taking this course. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-566 and PSY 512/PSY-557. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-558. (2 credit hours)

Provides a broad understanding of the roles and functions of professional psychologists. Topics covered include the ethical principles of psychologists, clinical standards of practice, legal issues and regulations, licensure, professional organizations, and coverage of issues affecting professional practice and the delivery of services. (3 credit hours)

This course explores the relationship between brain functions and human behavior. Topics include neuro-anatomical brain structure and development; neuropsychological functioning as it relates to sensory, motor, perceptual, emotional, linguistic, and cognitive abilities; organic syndromes and impairment; and the assessment and rehabilitation of various forms of central nervous system impairment. (3 credit hours)

This course covers various topics relating to cognitive and emotional influences on behavior. The focus is on the process and representations involved in memory, concept formation, speech and language, problem solving, creativity, reasoning, and emotion. Findings from experimental cognitive psychology and cognitive neuropsychology will be considered. (2 credit hours)

This course provides an understanding of human behavior as a function of social and cultural factors. Social psychology topics covered include social influence theory, attitude formation and change, social cognition, interpersonal perception, obedience and conformity, altruism, aggression, and stereotyping. The influence of factors such as cultural, racial, gender, and age differences on clinical practice are discussed. (3 credit hours)

This course explores the norms, transitions, and crises in the development of individuals from birth to old age. Theories and research findings involving cognitive, emotional, social, and personality development are covered. Emphasis is given to the interaction of the person and the environment while covering topics such as attachment, care giving, gender, and cognition. Comparisons across cultures, races, and socio-economic statuses will be included. (3 credit hours)

This course is a systematic, advanced survey of the major theories of personality and social psychology. Personality theories from the psychoanalytic, behavioral, phenomenological-existential, trait-factor and social learning traditions are presented and contrasted. The fundamental assumptions, nature of development, and individual variability of personality are presented for each outlook. The application of personality research is discussed in a variety of areas such as the study of aggression, anxiety, altruism, and locus of control. Concepts from social psychology include attitude formation and change, attribution theory, social persuasion, conformity, and social beliefs. (3 credit hours)

In this course, students refine the fundamental skills of therapeutic relationships. Covers skills in forming a therapeutic alliance; the mastery of empathic listening skills such as paraphrasing, reflecting, and the use of probes; the effective use of advanced relationship techniques such as confrontation, self-disclosure, and interpretation; the use of hypothesis testing in formulating treatment goals; and termination procedures and issues. Students are involved in role-play situations, as well as submitting audio taped and videotaped examples demonstrating mastery of skills. Ethical issues and the influence of factors such as gender, culture, age, and race on the therapy relationship are discussed. (3 credit hours)

This course covers cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapeutics approaches and research. Students explore a broad range of cognitive/cognitive-behavioral assessment and intervention strategies, as well as the theoretical foundations of these modalities. Skill development in cognitive/cognitive-behavioral therapy includes demonstrations, role playing, and video-tapes. Ethical and diversity issues are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY-541. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-560 (2 credit hours)

This course covers the theories and basic principles of learning and their practical applications. Topics include classical and operant conditioning, observational learning, behavior modification, and behavioral assessment. Learning approaches are examined for a variety of practical problems, settings, and populations. Professional and ethical considerations in the use of learning principles are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY-541. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-562 (2 credit hours)

This course presents the theories and methods of several models of brief therapy, including the crisis intervention model. The structure and rationale of brief therapies are examined as applied to a wide range of problems. The acquisition of skills essential for practice of short-term psychotherapy and crisis are covered. This course also includes specialized emergency assessment procedures such as the mental status examination, evaluation for the potential for suicide and violence, and other topics in crisis intervention. Empirical findings, professional issues, and ethical concerns are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY-541 (3 credit hours)

Exploration of treatment approaches from different psychodynamic perspectives such as ego-psychology, object-relations and self psychology. Perspectives on the therapeutic process are explored from contrasting viewpoints with respect to issues such as the nature of transference, the operation of defense mechanisms, the role of the unconscious, the meaning of resistance, and the importance of early childhood experiences. Students gain familiarity with representative intervention procedures from the different approaches. Empirical findings, professional issues, and ethical concerns are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY-541 (3 credit hours)

Involves coverage of theories, empirical research and skill training in the assessment and treatment of couples and families. The eclectic intervention model is emphasized in addressing issues such as stage in marital and family development; themes and dimensions of marital and family functioning; adaptation processes; social and cultural influences; divorce, remarriage, and blended families; family of origin; and other major concepts and methods involved in the systems approach to intervention. Prerequisite: PSY-541. This course is a prerequisite of PSY-563 (2 credit hours)

This course is an introduction to the major theories and practices of humanistic and existential models of psychotherapy, including Rogerian client-centered psychotherapy, Yalom’s existential psychotherapy, Frankl, Maslow, Perls’s Gestalt psychotherapy, and others. This course maintains a practical focus so as to assist students in developing empathic listening skills, paraphrasing felt meanings, and enhancing students’ awareness of their own feelings as they are elicited in the psychotherapy situation, as well as becoming attuned to the feelings communicated by their clients. Students submit audio-taped or videotaped recordings of practice interviews and engage in role-playing situations to master important skills and competencies. Prerequisite: PSY-541 (3 credit hours)

This course will consist of case discussions and psychological assessment reports for which students will be given the necessary data. Course meetings will review the previous week’s case and present the data for the next report. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-511 (1 credit hour)

Students develop competency in the use of cognitive assessment instruments through the administration and interpretation of major intelligence and achievement tests. The course requires students to be observed administering selected tests, as well as to submit a number of reports with test protocols for critique. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-512 (1 credit hour)

This course will consist of case review, psychological assessment reports, and discussions and review of examples of the scoring of personality tests. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-513 (1 credit hour)

Observation and practice of major techniques in cognitive and cognitive-behavioral approaches. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-542 (1 credit hour)

Observation and practice of major techniques in brief therapy and crisis intervention approaches. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-544 (1 credit hour)

Observation and practice of major techniques in learning and behavioral approaches to treatment. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-543 (1 credit hour)

Observation and practice of major techniques in family and marital systems approaches. This course is a co-requisite of PSY-546 (1 credit hour)

This course involves an examination of current issues related to the classification and diagnosis of abnormal behavior and psychological states. Dimensional, descriptive, and categorical approaches to classification are reviewed, with emphasis on the current forms of adult psychopathology found in the DSM. Topics include the symptomatology, etiology, developmental patterns, and treatment approaches to various diagnostic categories. Empirical findings, methodological concerns, and conceptual issues are discussed. (3 credit hours)

This course involves study of a particular area of psychology not covered comprehensively by one of the other advanced graduate courses. Students may receive credit more than once for this course if a different topic is covered each time. (1-3 credit hours)

Historical overview of the major theories and metatheoretical paradigms in the field of psychology. Surveys the historical and epistemological roots underlying current approaches in professional psychology. Through consideration of core issues in the philosophy of science, students develop the ability to critically evaluate different theoretical approaches in professional psychology. (3 credit hours)

Students will learn the definition and scope of consultation, education, and program evaluation as forms of psychological service. They will learn the methods used to conduct a needs assessment, monitor the outcome of programs, and explore the issues pertaining to cost/benefit decisions. Contracting, report writing, educational processes and professional issues will be examined. Methods of quality assurance and continuous quality improvement are also addressed. Prerequisites: PSY-520, PSY-523 and PSY-541 (2 credit hours)

Students will learn the purpose and methods of conducting supervision of psychotherapy. Several theories of supervision will be presented. Students will also learn the necessary steps to take in opening, managing, and marketing a private practice. Practice related issues, such as employees, business associates, HIPAA, documentation, overhead, and ethics will be examined. Prerequisites: PSY-520, PSY-523 and PSY-541(2 credit hours)

This course transmits foundational principles and associated skills for the assessment of various psychopathologies via dialogical interviews. Various styles of approaching the clinical interview will be presented, with a de-emphasis on manualized checklists. The central role of the importance of positive rapport-building and relatedness to the patient to facilitate the gathering of the history, leading to theorizing on the origins, meanings, functions, and purposes served by the symptom complex will be articulated. The symptom complex will be viewed contextually through which a broader understanding of the patient may be obtained, including personality organization and the interpretation of observed behavioral actions and patterns. The understanding of the clinical interview as a template for, and not merely a precursor of, the psychotherapy or psychodiagnostic endeavor to follow, will also be presented. Prerequisites: PSY-541(1 credit hour)

Involves a supervised field experience at an approved placement site. Emphasis is on the refinement of various skills involved in therapy, consultation, diagnosis, assessment, program management, and supervision. The doctoral practicum consists of a minimum of 12 hours per week on site. Students must concurrently participate in a weekly practicum seminar. The seminar groups provide opportunities for students to address issues related to clinical practice, ethics, case management, diversity, treatment strategies, consultation, supervision, program development, and other aspects of professional psychology. Students are required to make case presentations in the seminars. Prerequisites: PSY-511, PSY-512, PSY-513, PSY-520, PSY-541, PSY-542, PSY-556, PSY-557, PSY-558, PSY-560, PSY-565, PSY-627 (4 credit hours)

Involves a supervised field experience at an approved placement site. Emphasis is on the refinement of various skills involved in therapy, consultation, diagnosis, assessment, program management, and supervision. The doctoral practicum consists of a minimum of 12 hours per week on site. Students must concurrently participate in a weekly practicum seminar. The seminar groups provide opportunities for students to address issues related to clinical practice, ethics, case management, diversity, treatment strategies, consultation, supervision, program development, and other aspects of professional psychology. Students are required to make case presentations in the seminars. Prerequisites: 24 credit hours of PSY-650 (2-4 credit hours)

The Supplemental Practicum & Seminar is a supervised field experience that assists the student in remediating deficiencies that have emerged in prior field placements; and/or as assessed in the Psychotherapy Proficiency Examination, of the Comprehensive Examination sequence. The specific nature of the practicum and its foci vary and are tailored to meet the specific training requirements of the student. It may include a mixture of psychotherapy and psycho-diagnostic assessment responsibilities. Specifics of the Supplemental Practicum vary, depending on the requirements of the Remediation Plan. Participation in a Practicum Seminar under the direction of the Director of Clinical Training is required. (2-4 credit hours)

This advanced, elective course involves a supervised field experience at an approved placement site. Emphasis is on securing advanced levels of skills involved in some domain within professional psychology apart from the direct provision of clinical services to treatment populations. Traineeships may involve directed experience in supervision, program development, program evaluation, consultation, and/or other non-clinical services as approved by the program. The traineeship consists of a minimum of 12 hours per week on-site. The traineeship provides opportunities for students to further refine and hone professional competencies related to administration, management, program development, program evaluation, consultation, and supervision, in which clinical psychologists often are involved. Prerequisite: 24 credit hours of PSY-650 (2-4 credit hours)

This course is required of all PsyD students who are actively involved in the ongoing preparation, literature research, data collecting, analysis, or writing of a dissertation. Students must register with a faculty advisor when enrolling in this course. (1-3 credit hours)

This involves a 2,000 hour supervised experience in an organized health service training program over a 12-24 month period. The internship is required for all PsyD students after successful completion of all doctoral coursework, comprehensive exam, and residency requirements. Intern placements must be approved by the School of Psychological Sciences. Prerequisites: Completion of coursework, comprehensive exams and dissertation proposal

Master's degree option courses

This is an advanced-level course covering the principles and practices of conducting therapeutic groups. Topics include issues related to various types of groups and group interventions, management of group process, and resolving typical group issues. Theory and research concerning group therapy will also be reviewed. Students are required to participate in in-class group experiences and analyze group dynamics in various scenarios and role plays. Prerequisites: PSY-541, PSY-542/PSY-560, PSY-544/PSY-561 (3 credit hours)

This course is the first of a two semester capstone seminar designed to prepare students to conceptualize, evaluate, and present clinical cases and to prepare students for employment in a health care environment that increasingly emphasizes professional accountability. Topics covered include case conceptualization, treatment planning, empirically supported treatments, researching and writing case-focused literature reviews, single-case and N=1 research methodology, writing case studies and treatment reports. Students are required to be concurrently enrolled in PSY-550 (3 credit hours)

Concentration courses

Health psychology & behavioral medicine

This course builds upon a bio-psycho-social model and is a survey of the field of addictions and substance misuse. The course will explore various etiological and explanatory models of this varied spectrum of disorders. Issues pertaining to the treatment setting as well as interventions and treatment approaches utilized in the field of addictions will be closely examined. Historical and contemporary perspectives are examined. Other topics will include the mechanisms of action of drugs of abuse; pharmacological adjuncts to treatment; and some of the non-pharmacological ‘addictions’, related to such issues as gambling and sex. (1-3 credit hours)

Provides advanced knowledge of behavioral medicine and health psychology assessment and treatment techniques. Students learn about various issues in the field of rehabilitation psychology. The course explores a variety of alternative medicine/complementary medicine treatment techniques. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-566, PSY-512/PSY-557, PSY-513/PSy-558, PSY-521, PSY-541, PSY-558 (1-3 credit hours)

Provides an introduction to basic principles of pharmacology and psychopharmacology. It covers the history of the development of the major medications and classes of medicines in use today for the pharmacologic treatment of mental illness. The specific effects of these medications at the molecular level as well as their influence on symptomatology are examined. Other topics are addressed including rational selection of medication within major classes, polypharmacy, and side effects. Prerequisites: PSY-521, PSY-565 (3 credit hours)

Childhood & adolescent psychology

This course builds upon a bio-psycho-social model and is a survey of the field of eating and weight disorders. The course will examine the etiology of eating disorders; the development of eating behaviors; pediatric feeding disorders; anorexia nervosa; bulimia; binge-eating disorder; obesity; risk factors for eating and weight disorders; the assessment of eating and weight disorders; and the treatment of eating and weight disorders. Prerequisite: PSY-545 (1-3 credit hours)

Students will learn the prevalence, types and diagnostic criteria for ADHD. They will have an understanding of the risks, prognosis and co-morbid diagnoses associated with an ADHD diagnosis. Students will become familiar with and learn how to use, score and interpret screening and diagnostic measures for ADHD, will understand the appropriate recommendations and accommodations for students with ADHD. In addition, communication of findings to parents, physicians and teachers will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-556, PSY-512/PSY-557, PSY-513/PSY-558, PSY-565, PSY-671 (1-3 credit hours)

This course involves a detailed study of child and adolescent disorders. Extensive case material, psychological test data, readings, class discussion, student presentations, and films are used to convey the nature and phenomenology of the disorders. Students acquire the theoretical and practical skills necessary to prepare them for work in child and adolescent assessment and treatment. Disorders will be discussed in terms of etiology, epidemiology, course, phenomenology, diagnostic issues, assessment, and treatment. Particular attention will be paid to understanding the impact of development, family, and culture on child and adolescent psychopathology. Emphasis is on conceptualizing disorders from the perspectives of contemporary psychological theory and developmental psychopathology. Prerequisites: PSY-541, PSY-565 (3 credit hours)

This course provides an overview of diverse approaches to therapy with children and adolescents, with an emphasis on individual approaches. The importance of gaining the cooperation of families in all aspects of working with children is addressed throughout the course. It focuses on the understanding of critical empirical and theoretical issues related to the various intervention approaches. Prerequisites: PSY-541 (3 credit hours)

This course covers topics pertaining to the psychological assessment of children and adolescents. The emphasis will be on the integration of data gathered from developmental, cognitive, and personality measures. Topics covered will be assessments tailored to specific referral questions and populations (e.g., assessing pervasive developmental disorders, learning disabilities, personality and cognitive functioning, school behavior, parent-child interaction, and parenting). Course activities will include test administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing. This class is best taken conjointly with practicum. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-556, PSY-512/PSY-557, PSY-513/PSY-558, and PSY-671 (3 credit hours)

Adult psychopathology & psychotherapy

This course builds upon a bio-psycho-social model and is a survey of the field of addictions and substance misuse. The course will explore various etiological and explanatory models of this varied spectrum of disorders. Issues pertaining to the treatment setting as well as interventions and treatment approaches utilized in the field of addictions will be closely examined. Historical and contemporary perspectives are examined. Other topics will include the mechanisms of action of drugs of abuse; pharmacological adjuncts to treatment; and some of the non-pharmacological ‘addictions’, related to such issues as gambling and sex. (1-3 credit hours)

This course builds on students’ previous academic work in the field of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and discusses how to apply the psychotherapy to individuals with psychotic disorders. Specifically, the cognitive approach for working with delusions, hallucinations, and negative symptoms will be detailed. Prerequisites: PSY-541, PSY-542, PSY-560 (1-2 credit hours)

This advanced seminar examines the extension of theoretical and clinical applications of psychoanalysis to patients suffering from severe psychopathology and associated structural, characterological deficits. Special emphasis will be placed on examining the treatment setting, transference, counter-transference, and the inter-subjective aspects of managing the often unique vicissitudes of psychotherapeutic work with such patients. Developing the capacity to provide structuralizing, containing, and interpretative functions as well as managing regressions will be explored. Students will deepen their grounding in various psychoanalytical paradigms. Prerequisite: PSY-545 (1-3 credit hours)

This course builds upon a bio-psycho-social model and is a survey of the field of eating and weight disorders. The course will examine the etiology of eating disorders; the development of eating behaviors; pediatric feeding disorders; anorexia nervosa; bulimia; binge-eating disorder; obesity; risk factors for eating and weight disorders; the assessment of eating and weight disorders; and the treatment of eating and weight disorders. Prerequisite: PSY-545 (1-3 credit hours)

Psychoanalytical psychotherapy with severely disturbed individuals including the more regressed borderline, schizophrenic, and manic-depressive/bi-polar patient will be the subject of this course. Contemporary theoretical, scholarly, and psychotherapeutic work regarding psychotic processes will be explored. The psychotherapeutic relationship; the management of regression; working clinically with hallucinations and delusions; crises; rage; the subjective experience of the patient; transference; counter-transference; and the phases of treatment are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY-545 (1-3 credit hours)

Students will learn the prevalence, types and diagnostic criteria for ADHD. They will have an understanding of the risks, prognosis and co-morbid diagnoses associated with an ADHD diagnosis. Students will become familiar with and learn how to use, score and interpret screening and diagnostic measures for ADHD, will understand the appropriate recommendations and accommodations for students with ADHD. In addition, communication of findings to parents, physicians and teachers will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-556, PSY-512/PSY-557, PSY-513/PSY-558, PSY-565, PSY-671(1-3 credit hours)

This course is structured as an applied clinical seminar designed to provide basic knowledge and skills for using hypnosis in psychotherapy and behavioral medicine. Hypnotizability, hypnotic phenomena, and all major theoretical positions as well as relevant research along with a range of treatment applications will be transmitted via lecture, group discussion, demonstration, video-tape case materials, supervised practice, and case presentation. Prerequisites: PSY-520, PSY-541, PSY 542, PSY-560, PSY-545 (1-3 credit hours)

This course will explore a variety of issues related to the clinical, ethical, and theoretical practice of forensic psychotherapy. Included in this study will be a specific emphasis upon psychodynamic, existential-phenomenological, and humanistic approaches to forensic psychotherapy as well as the way in which the "offender" client is socially constructed within the context of clinical, ethical and theoretical practice. Prerequisites: PSY-520, PSY-523, PSY-541, PSY 547 (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to give students exposure to various paradigms of and hands-on experience with the process of neuropsychological assessment for adult and geriatric populations. The predominant theories concerned with the evaluation of brain and behavior relationships are covered along with assessment techniques that have evolved from these theories. This course examines the current state of neuropsychological assessment and the role of the neuropsychologist in various mental and medical health care settings. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-556, PSY-512/PSY-557, PSY-513/PSY-558, PSY-521, PSY-524 (3 credit hours)

This course enhances the student’s working knowledge and clinical skills when working with aging and older adults. Particular emphasis is placed on the clinical interview, aging and public policy, behavioral and physical health care practice, function in long-term care facilities, and Alzheimer’s disease. It focuses on the appreciation for the political and health care climate which continues to shape and determine the type of services they will be providing to aging adults during the next decade. Prerequisites: PSY-524, PSY-541 (3 credit hours)

This course covers topics pertaining to the theory and application of projective assessment in clinical psychology. The emphasis will be on the integration of nomothetic/empirical and idiographic/phenomenological/hermeneutic approaches. Students will learn the following methods to Rorschach and TAT scoring and interpretation: Comprehensive System (Exner), Mutuality of Autonomy Scale (Urist) and Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale (Westen). Psychodynamic and phenomenological/ constructivist theory will provide the theoretical perspectives that under gird discussions of projective assessment data collection, report writing, and the provision of feedback to patients. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-556, PSY-512/PSY-557, PSY-513/PSY-558, PSY-541, PSY-545, PSY-565 (1-3 credit hours)

This course covers topics pertaining to the psychological assessment of adults. The emphasis will be on the integration of nomothetic/empirical perspectives with idiographic/phenomenological/hermeneutic approaches. Topics covered will include assessing special populations (e.g., severely mentally ill, trauma, professionals in crisis, forensic, parents), therapeutic assessment, person-centered report-writing, providing feedback, theoretical and scientific issues in assessment, and current controversies. This class is best taken conjointly with practicum. Prerequisites: PSY-511/PSY-556, PSY-512/PSY-557, PSY-513/PSY-558 and PSY-535. Recommended: PSY-679. (1-3 credit hours)